Posted by: Government & Heritage Library | April 20, 2012

State Doc Pick of the Week: Made in North Carolina

Made in North Carolina: recycled-content products help fuel the state’s economy, was published in 2007 by the NC Recycling Business Assistance Center, a program of the Division of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance of the NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

Recycled wood.

While manufacturing jobs have been decreasing across the country, North Carolina has added recycling positions at a rapid pace.  Between 1994 and 2004, recycling jobs in North Carolina have increased by 60% (page 1). This  document attempts to showcase some of these companies as well as provide information to assist companies using recycled materials.  Contained in this publication is a list of NC recycling business assistance providers and companies that use recycled materials.

This State Document provides profiles of North Carolina companies that produce items from recycled materials.  Did you know that Heartwood Pine Floors Inc. of Pittsboro salvages wood beams, decking, and timber and processes it into high quality wood flooring? (page 17) They recycle roughly 1,800 tons of wood every year! Check out this publication for more companies who produce products with recycled materials.

To view, print, or save this document click here.

Posted by: Government & Heritage Library | April 20, 2012

State Doc Pick of the Week: Made in North Carolina

Made in North Carolina: recycled-content products help fuel the state’s economy, was published in 2007 by the NC Recycling Business Assistance Center, a program of the Division of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance of the NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

Recycled wood.

While manufacturing jobs have been decreasing across the country, North Carolina has added recycling positions at a rapid pace.  Between 1994 and 2004, recycling jobs in North Carolina have increased by 60% (page 1). This  document attempts to showcase some of these companies as well as provide information to assist companies using recycled materials.  Contained in this publication is a list of NC recycling business assistance providers and companies that use recycled materials.

This State Document provides profiles of North Carolina companies that produce items from recycled materials.  Did you know that Heartwood Pine Floors Inc. of Pittsboro salvages wood beams, decking, and timber and processes it into high quality wood flooring? (page 17) They recycle roughly 1,800 tons of wood every year! Check out this publication for more companies who produce products with recycled materials.

To view, print, or save this document click here.

The 2010 Lawyer's Handbook

The 2010 Lawyer's Handbook

The Lawyer’s Handbook, published annually by the North Carolina State Bar, contains “the rules and regulations of the North Carolina State Bar, the annotated Rules of Professional Conduct, all RPC ethics opinions, trust account guidelines, and the directory of board certified legal specialists”. Every other year, the Lawyer’s Handbook is sent to every attorney in North Carolina, and is an important reference work for the state’s legal community.

The North Carolina State Government Publications Collection, one of the digital collections of the State Library of North Carolina, has digital versions of the Lawyer’s Handbook for the years 2002 through 2010. They can be seen at http://digital.ncdcr.gov/u?/p249901coll22,71270, where each volume can be searched, saved, downloaded and/or printed.

Posted by: Genealogical Services | December 31, 2010

Vital Records – Birth Certificates in NC

Vital records are the cornerstone of genealogical research. In North
Carolina, birth certificates were not recorded until 1913 when the state’s General Assembly passed a law “An Act to Provide for the Registration of all Births and Deaths in the State of North Carolina.” Although the 1913 law required all births to be recorded, many births during this period still took place in the home, not a hospital, so enforcement of the law took some time. The exception to this is the cities of Raleigh and Wilmington. Raleigh began recording births as early as 1890 and Wilmington began in 1904. Births were not recorded regularly until World War II. The 1913 law stated in section 13 “That within ten days after the date of each birth there shall be filed with the local registrar of the district in which the birth occurred a certificate of such birth…”. Section 14 of the law outlines the information that is to be included on the certificate: Read More…

Posted by: Lisa (Digital Information Management Program) | October 28, 2010

Marriage and Death Notices

The Family Records Collection, a joint project with the North Carolina State Archives, currently contains over one thousand Bible records. Today we’re highlighting another searchable resource in the collection: marriage and death notices indexed from the Raleigh Register and the North Carolina State Gazette.  Created by Carrie L. Broughton, State Librarian, these volumes contain the brides and grooms (for marriages) and the deceased’s name (for deaths), any location information mentioned in the announcement, as well as a citation to the item in the newspaper.  For marriages, items are listed twice – both under the bride and the groom.

 

Marriage Index

An example from the Marriages & Death Notices.

 

The indexed items date from 1799 through 1893. Click on the links below to browse these volumes, or go to the family records collection search page to search for a particular name.

Posted by: Lisa (Digital Information Management Program) | October 14, 2010

Using the Family Records Collection

Menu with Page & TextWe try our best to make our collections accessible and usable, but sometimes there are features that just aren’t easy to find. Hopefully, you’ve already taken a  look at the Family Records Collection (a joint project with the North Carolina State Archives). There you can find digital copies of Bible records and other genealogical materials. When you look at a Bible record, try clicking on “page & text” in the upper left.  You’ll then see the record in a new window, with a transcription done by one of our staff or volunteers.  (See the example below, from the Charles L. Hinton Family Bible Records.) This feature helps when trying to decipher handwriting that is sometimes cramped, faded, or very different from handwriting today.   If you see what you believe is an error in our transcription or if you’d like to volunteer to transcribe, we’d love to hear from you.

 

Excerpt from Hinton Bible

This is an excerpt from the Hinton Bible.

 

 

Bible Record Transcription

Here's the accompanying textual transcription.

 


Posted by: Kurt Brenneman | October 8, 2010

State Doc Pick of the Week: North Carolina State Energy Report

Published by the North Carolina Energy Policy Council
North Carolina State Energy Report

The State Doc Pick of the Week is the North Carolina State Energy Report, which was prepared by Appalachian State University and published by the North Carolina Energy Policy Council and the North Carolina Energy Office. Look here for state data on energy consumption, use of fossil and nuclear fuels, the electricity market, alternative fuels, renewable energy sources, energy usage by the public sector, transportation energy use, residential energy use, and energy efficiency.

Read More…

Posted by: ncencyclopedia | October 7, 2010

Official State Horse raises federal concerns

“There’s a state horse?!?!” commented a recent visitor to the NCpedia’s Colonial Spanish Mustang entry (http://ncpedia.org/symbols/horse).

Colonial Spanish Mustange

Yes! There is! It is a new addition to the list of Official State Symbols passed by the North Caroling General Assembly.

Why the Colonial Spanish Mustang and why now? Colonial Spanish Mustangs on the Currituck Outer Banks and Shackleford Banks are believed to have descended from a herd brought to America in the 1520s in a Spanish colonial mission. Students at Shawboro Elementary School in Currituck County recently requested that the North Carolina General Assembly designate them as the Official State Horse of North Carolina. Their request was approved in June, 2010.

The future of the herd of wild mustangs is uncertain as federal regulations address concerns raised by scientists and developers.

Once numbering in the thousands, attempts to keep it down to no more than sixty may be on the horizon.

For more information:

Breen, Tom. “North Carolina Wild Horses Face Uncertain Future.” Associated Press. Sept. 20, 2010. Accessed via WRAL: http://www.wral.com/news/state/story/8315939/

NCpedia’s NC State Symbols page: http://ncpedia.org/symbols

Posted by: Reference and Outreach | October 6, 2010

Picture of the Week: Loving Family Bible Records

Family portraits from the Julian Richard and Loula Omohundro Loving Family Bible Records

This week’s Picture of the Week is from the Julian Richard and Loula Omohundro Loving Family Bible Records which can be found in the North Carolina Family Records Online.

To see this item in the collection please go here:

http://digital.ncdcr.gov/u?/p15012coll1,11755

The Julian Richard and Loula Omohundro Loving Family Records was one of the 320 plus records added to the North Carolina Family Records Online in  August 2010.

Read More…

The Government and Heritage Library has just received a number of wonderful gift books. One is the November 2009 issue of the “Swiss American Historical Society Review.” Dedicated to the Tercentenary of New Bern, North Carolina, the entire issue contains articles about the founding of New Bern, its early history and descendents of early settlers. Lists of the Bernese and Swiss emigrants who came to New Bern in 1710 are included along with the content of letters written by early Swiss settlers.

“When the Parkway Came” by Anne and David Whisnant, contains personal recollections of events and experiences during construction of the Blue Ridge Parkway in western North Carolina. Photographs in the book come from a variety of sources including the special collections of UNC Asheville and UNC Chapel Hill Libraries, Norfolk Southern Corporation, the North Carolina State Archives, North Carolina Office of Historic Preservation, Blue Ridge Parkway Archives and the personal collection of the Blue Ridge Parkway photographer.

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